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Vayelech in a Nutshell

The Parshah of Vayelech (“and he went”) recounts the events of Moses’ last day of earthly life. “I am one hundred and twenty years old today,” he says to the people, “and I can no longer go forth and come in.” He transfers the leadership to Joshua, and writes (or concludes writing) the Torah in a scroll which he entrusts to the Levites for safekeeping in the Ark of the Covenant.

The mitzvah of hak’hel (“gather”) is given: every seven years, during the festival of Sukkot of the first year of the shemittah cycle, the entire people of Israel—men, women and children—should gather at the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, where the king should read to them from the Torah.

Vayelech concludes with the prediction that the people of Israel will turn away from their covenant with G‑d, causing Him to hide His face from them, but also with the promise that the words of the Torah “shall not be forgotten out of the mouths of their descendants.”

Nitzavim in a Nutshell

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The Parshah of Nitzavim includes some of the most fundamental principles of the Jewish faith:

The unity of Israel: “You stand today, all of you, before the L‑rd your G‑d: your heads, your tribes, your elders, your officers, and every Israelite man; your young ones, your wives, the stranger in your gate; from your wood-hewer to your water-drawer.”

The future redemption: Moses warns of the exile and desolation of the Land that will result if Israel abandons G‑d’s laws, but then he prophesies that in the end, “You will return to the L‑rd your G‑d . . . If your outcasts shall be at the ends of the heavens, from there will the L‑rd your G‑d gather you . . . and bring you into the Land which your fathers have possessed.”

The practicality of Torah: “For the mitzvah which I command you this day, it is not beyond you, nor is it remote from you. It is not in heaven . . . It is not across the sea . . . Rather, it is very close to you, in your mouth, in your heart, that you may do it.”

Freedom of choice: “I have set before you life and goodness, and death and evil: in that I command you this day to love G‑d, to walk in His ways and to keep His commandments . . . Life and death I have set before you, blessing and curse. And you shall choose life.”

Former President of Israel, Shimon Peres, has died

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‘We must ensure that we never lose faith in a better future, a better world’ –  Shimon Peres (July 21, 2016)

On September 13, 2016, Shimon Peres, former president of Israel, was taken to Tel Hashomer hospital near Tel Aviv and admitted to the intensive care unit where he was kept alive in a coma until today, when passed away today at 03:40 Israel time. The family did not want to keep him alive by artificial means and the machines were turned off at approximately midnight Tuesday.

Peres had been sedated and placed on a respirator where CT scans had confirmed heavy bleeding in his brain. The 93-year-old had suffered a massive stroke.

Shortly after being admitted to hospital, Peres’ son Hemi spoke to reporters and asked people to pray for his father.

“These have not been easy hours for my family and I. We have received many messages from people in Israel and abroad, who have enveloped us with warmth and love.”

He added: “Nothing is more precious to my father than the nation of Israel and its people. My father is a special person. I am remaining optimistic. I am praying and hoping for the best.”

The Tuesday morning of the stroke Peres made a video about buying Israeli products, blue and white.

“What is a ‘blue-and-white’ product?” wrote Peres in a caption accompanying a clip published on his Facebook page. “For me, it’s Israeli salad, our wonderful fruits, our excellent industry and our developed high-tech sector. I am proud of Israeli industry,” he wrote.

“Can you imagine a meal without an Israeli salad, can you imagine setting the table without [a plate of] Israeli fruits? There are 350 foreign companies investing in Israel… Why did they come? Because our products have an outstanding reputation. And so, what’s good for them is good for us. Give a ‘like’ for Israeli-made products,” Peres urged. See the video below.

Born in Wiszniew, Poland (now Vishnyeva, Belarus), Peres was one of the founders of the Labor-Zionist Youth Movement and a member of Haganah during the pre-state period. He became director-general of the defense ministry at age 29 and was a member of the Knesset from 1959 to 2007.

To escape the persecution of Jews the family fled to Palestine in 1934. Peres studied agricultural science and joined the party of the Zionist leader David Ben Gurion. When Arab forces launched their attack on the new state of Israel in 1948, Peres was given the chief responsibility for securing military equipment for Israel from abroad. Later he organized Israel’s nuclear program and is regarded as the father of Israel’s atom bomb.

 In 1994 Peres won The Nobel Peace Prize for “reconciliation with the Palestinians,” together with Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat.

He served in different political parties, namely Mapai, Rafi, the Alignment, Labor and Kadima.

Peres spent a long period as Labor Party chairman, and held a string of government roles including two non-consecutive stints as prime minister, and over the years he was minister of immigrant absorption; transport; information; defense; communications (or posts and telegraphs as it was known then); internal affairs; religious affairs; foreign affairs; finance; and regional cooperation.

He served in some of these positions more than once. He also had various stints as acting prime minister, deputy prime minister and vice prime minister.

Shimon Peres - Nobel Peace Prize

Israel News Online wishes his family a long life, and may his memory be a blessing.

 

Ki Tavo in a Nutshell

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Moses instructs the people of Israel: When you enter the land that G‑d is giving to you as your eternal heritage, and you settle it and cultivate it, bring the first-ripened fruits (bikkurim) of your orchard to the Holy Temple, and declare your gratitude for all that G‑d has done for you.

Our Parshah also includes the laws of the tithes given to the Levites and to the poor, and detailed instructions on how to proclaim the blessings and the curses on Mount Gerizim and Mount Eival—as discussed in the beginning of the Parshah of Re’eh. Moses reminds the people that they are G‑d’s chosen people, and that they, in turn, have chosen G‑d.

The latter part of Ki Tavo consists of the Tochachah (“Rebuke”). After listing the blessings with which G‑d will reward the people when they follow the laws of the Torah, Moses gives a long, harsh account of the bad things—illness, famine, poverty and exile—that shall befall them if they abandon G‑d’s commandments.

Moses concludes by telling the people that only today, forty years after their birth as a people, have they attained “a heart to know, eyes to see and ears to hear.”

Parashat Ki Tetze – On Leadership, Responsibility and Neglect

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Please find attached weekly parasha by Rabbi Yehiel Wasserman.

Rabbi Yehiel Wasserman is a member of the Zionist executive board and the director of
the Center for Religious Affairs in the Diaspora.

Passion for Sephardic Music

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http://jeumag.com/pulse/passion-for-sephardic-music

 

Chabad Serbia Opened

Shoftim in a Nutshell

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Moses instructs the people of Israel to appoint judges and law enforcement officers in every city. “Justice, justice shall you pursue,” he commands them, and you must administer it without corruption or favoritism. Crimes must be meticulously investigated and evidence thoroughly examined—a minimum of two credible witnesses is required for conviction and punishment.

In every generation, says Moses, there will be those entrusted with the task of interpreting and applying the laws of the Torah. “According to the law that they will teach you, and the judgment they will instruct you, you shall do; you shall not turn away from the thing that they say to you, to the right nor to the left.”

Shoftim also includes the prohibitions against idolatry and sorcery; laws governing the appointment and behavior of a king; and guidelines for the creation of “cities of refuge” for the inadvertent murderer. Also set forth are many of the rules of war: the exemption from battle for one who has just built a home, planted a vineyard, married, or is “afraid and soft-hearted”; the requirement to offer terms of peace before attacking a city; and the prohibition against wanton destruction of something of value, exemplified by the law that forbids to cut down a fruit tree when laying siege (in this context the Torah makes the famous statement, “For man is a tree of the field”).

The Parshah concludes with the law of the eglah arufah—the special procedure to be followed when a person is killed by an unknown murderer and his body is found in a field—which underscores the responsibility of the community and its leaders not only for what they do, but also for what they might have prevented from being done.

Re’eh in a Nutshell

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See,” says Moses to the people of Israel, “I place before you today a blessing and a curse”—the blessing that will come when they fulfill G‑d’s commandments, and the curse if they abandon them. These should be proclaimed on Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal when the people cross over into the Holy Land.

A Temple should be established in “the place that G‑d will choose to make dwell His name there,” where the people should bring their sacrifices to Him; it is forbidden to make offerings to G‑d in any other place. It is permitted to slaughter animals elsewhere, not as a sacrifice but to eat their meat; the blood (which in the Temple is poured upon the altar), however, may not be eaten.

A false prophet, or one who entices others to worship idols, should be put to death; an idolatrous city must be destroyed. The identifying signs for kosher animals and fish, and the list of non-kosher birds (first given in Leviticus 11), are repeated.

A tenth of all produce is to be eaten in Jerusalem, or else exchanged for money with which food is purchased and eaten there. In certain years this tithe is given to the poor instead. Firstborn cattle and sheep are to be offered in the Temple, and their meat eaten by the kohanim (priests).

The mitzvah of charity obligates a Jew to aid a needy fellow with a gift or loan. On the Sabbatical year (occurring every seventh year), all loans are to be forgiven. All indentured servants are to be set free after six years of service.

Our Parshah concludes with the laws of the three pilgrimage festivals—Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot—when all should go to “see and be seen” before G‑d in the Holy Temple.

http://www.chabad.org

 

Va’etchanan in a Nutshell

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Moses tells the people of Israel how he implored G‑d to allow him to enter the Land of Israel, but G‑d refused, instructing him instead to ascend a mountain and see the Promised Land.

Continuing his “review of the Torah,” Moses describes the Exodus from Egypt and the Giving of the Torah, declaring them unprecedented events in human history. “Has there ever occurred this great thing, or has the likes of it ever been heard? Did ever a people hear the voice of G‑d speaking out of the midst of the fire . . . and live? . . . You were shown, to know, that the L‑rd is G‑d . . . there is none else beside Him.”

Moses predicts that in future generations the people will turn away from G‑d, worship idols, and be exiled from their land and scattered amongst the nations; but from there they will seek G‑d, and return to obey His commandments.

Our Parshah also includes a repetition of the Ten Commandments, and the verses of the Shema, which declare the fundamentals of the Jewish faith: the unity of G‑d (“Hear O Israel: the L‑rd our G‑d, the L‑rd is one”); the mitzvot to love G‑d, to study His Torah, and to bind “these words” as tefillin on our arms and heads, and inscribe them in the mezuzot affixed on the doorposts of our homes.

www.chabad.org

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Jewish Community and Cultural Center in Doboj

We are dedicated to the preservation of the Jewish religion, tradition and identity in the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina and to the preservation and promotion of peace, cultural and economic cooperation among all nations in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Our vision is to promote good interpersonal and interfaith relations, tolerance and compromise between peoples and eradicate racial, religious, ethnic or any other form of discrimination.

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